Soap Pieces

I have a quart jar filled with little soap pieces that were the tail end of bars of soap. Any ideas on what I can do with these? I started saving them because someone told me I could make liquid soap to use at the sink out of them and thereby save money but I don't know how to do that. help?



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Comments

  1. Take make liquid soap:
    1/2 cup soap pieces, chopped or grated
    1 – 1 1/2 cups water
    Teaspoon glycerine (optional, but it helps)
    Few drops essential oil (optional, for scent)

    Put the soap and water in a saucepan on low heat, stirring until the soap is dissolved. Leave to cool, stir in other ingredients.
    You can use this as handwash or bodywash.
    Old ‘pump’ soap bottles are good containers, however use what you have.
    You can make up a bulk amount and store it in jars/bottles for refills.

  2. My dad saves the scraps, sticks them in a double boiler to melt them down and pours them out into new blocks. I have no idea how to make liquid soap though, so I’m stuck on that one.

  3. Oh fun to have that many soap scraps! I use what Annie says to make liquid soap, but I don’t have glycerin. You can also grate it and mix it with warm water. If you want, add some scent or oats. Roll into balls and you have “remilled” soap balls! A fun & practical gift. :) Enjoy!

  4. When I was small I found a little gadget in one of the mail order catalogs and bought it for my mother. You would save all your bar soap scraps and put them in this little soap container. When it was full you would put the lid on and soak the container in hot water until the soap melted just enough and it would give you a brand new bar of soaf from all of the soap scraps. I have always wanted to buy another one of these but could never find it in any catalog again. If anyone knows where I can get one please let me know!

  5. Put a handful of soap scraps into an old pantyhose leg and tie it shut. Cut the pantyhose above the knot. I’ve seen these hung outside at the water hydrant for washing up after gardening and see no reason why you couldn’t make a small version for use in the bathroom.

  6. Becky B. says:

    I stick a sliver of one bar onto a new, wet bar that we’ve used once or twice. They get completely used up that way.

  7. you can shave the soap pc’s (use a veggie peeler) then add a little water to make them soft (squish them up with your hands) and with your hands roll them into a soapball. Don’t add too much water just a bit at a time. Let it sit in a dry area for a while then use like you would a soap bar. I would do this with the shavings from the bars of soap I would make. They last as long as a bar of soap and their neat looking!

  8. Take a couple of “net bags” (like the ones onions come in) or cut a square of tulle and tie up with a ribbon or shoe lace and put the slivers in. You can use it like a “soap puff”. Use it when you need to gently exfoliate your skin.

  9. Linda E says:

    I keep an old jar under my sink about 1/2 full of water. I drop my soap scraps in this and let it sit. When I get enough I will put it in a pump bottle to use at my sink. The soap naturally melts because it is sitting in water. Make sure to put the lid on.

  10. I find that sports bottles (the plastic squeezy kind with the pop tops) work great for liquid soap. It doesn’t matter if the consistency isn’t quite as thin as for a pump bottle, most bits can still get through the spout. Plus it’s very easy to water down the mix if you need to. Maybe not the best idea if your kids insist on squeezing like there’s no tomorrow, but it works great for adults.

    Also, if you’ve got several different scented soap scraps, be careful when mixing them – some people find they have a reaction to all the scents mixed together, even if they’re fine using them one at a time.

  11. Well shucks, I was kind of excited that I would finally have an answer to looking for request. Oh well you guys beat me to it. lol. With that being said, one other poster spoke of melting them and pouring them into new bars. Well how about melting them down and pouring them into candy molds or the like. What a cute and frugal addition to a gift. You guys are awesome. Now I am going to keep looking to see if have an answer to someone’s request. :)

  12. Make a soap bag out of a part of a wash cloth and light cottn and load all those pesky pieces in there use Velcro to close the bag. My grandma used to use an old leg of panty hose for the same purpose. Also I’ve heard that you can grate them and add hot water to it into make liquid soap. Good luck!