How To Season and Re-Season Cast Iron Cookware

The following is a small excerpt from “The Hillbilly Housewife’s Cast Iron Cookbook“. It’s the most frequent question I get about cooking with cast iron skillets. 

Over time, cast iron cookware develops a thin protective coating known as “seasoning” from the natural fats and oils associated with the cooking process. This coating fills in all the nooks and crannies inherent in the pan metal to create a smooth, uniform surface.

This seasoning is what gives cast iron cookware its wonderful non-stick quality.

Today, most new cast iron cookware comes with this protective coating or “seasoning” already on them. If the package has “pre-seasoned” printed on it, your new pan should be ready for use because the manufacturer has already completed the initial seasoning process for you.

When you buy a brand new pre-seasoned cast iron skillet, all you need to do is rinse it out in hot water and dry completely by placing on your cooktop over medium-high heat. Make sure the entire surface is dry before putting away because cast iron can and will rust if water is left sitting on its surface.

After cooking with your new cast iron skillet, wash it by hand in hot water right away. Avoid putting your skillet in the dishwasher or soaking it in water overnight due to the potential for rust.

Instead, once the pan cools to the touch, rinse it under hot water while using a dishcloth or soft-bristled nylon brush to remove cooked-on particles. Also avoid using any harsh soaps, detergents, or metal scouring pads and scrapers as these items can damage or remove the seasoning.

Cast Iron Skillet How to Re-Season Your Cast Iron Skillet

If your seasoned cast iron cookware loses its sheen for whatever reason, you may need to re-season it to get it back into tip-top shape.

If you search online for how to re-season a cast iron skillet, you may be a bit overwhelmed by all the different points of view out there regarding the best methods and types of oil to use.

For example, there is a lot of debate about what oil to use due to the different smoke points associated with each type of oil and the release of unhealthy free radicals caused by using oils with too-low smoke points. As a result, flaxseed oil is often suggested as an ideal oil to use due to its high smoke point.

According to Lodge, a leading manufacturer of cast iron cookware, the proper way to re-season their products is to start by preheating your oven to 350 – 400˚.  While it is heating, wash the pan with hot, soapy water and a stiff brush. (It’s okay to use harsher soap and a stiff brush for this because you’re not trying to protect the original seasoning at this point).

Once clean, rinse and dry completely before applying a very thin coat of melted solid vegetable shortening or other cooking oil of your choice. Place the pan upside down on the upper rack of your preheated oven, with a metal cooking sheet under it to catch any drips.

Leave pan in hot oven for at least an hour. Turn oven off and allow the skillet to cool completely while still inside the oven. Remove pan from oven and if the coating isn’t as consistent as you’d like, repeat this process until the desired sheen is achieved.

Following these easy tips on how to care for your cast iron cookware will help keep your pieces in great shape. A minimal investment of time and effort on your part will yield delicious meals for you and your family for years to come.

Cast Iron Skillet French Toast

You know that I love my cast iron skillets. I won’t bake up cornbread in anything else, but they are useful for so many other cooking jobs as well. Once you’ve built up a nice bit of coating on them, they cook better than any non-stick pan.

Today I’d like to share my recipe for Cast Iron French Toast with you. It’s from the Hillbilly Housewife’s Cast Iron Cookbook. If you have never made french toast in a cast iron skillet, please give it a try. The even temperature gives it a wonderful little crust that’s hard to replicate in any other way.

Cast Iron Skillet French Toast
 
Ingredients
  • 10-12 Slices Bread (French or Italian White Bread works best)
  • 6 Large Eggs
  • ⅓ cup milk
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Butter
  • Powdered Sugar
  • Syrup
Instructions
  1. In a large, shallow bowl, mix together eggs, milk, cinnamon, and vanilla until well combined.
  2. Warm cast iron skillet over medium-low heat. Lightly grease with butter.
  3. Dip pieces of bread one at a time. Immerse and coat both sides. Don’t soak too long or it'll get soggy and fall apart. Just dip it briefly so it gets immersed. Soak only as many slices as you will be cooking at one time. Place the soaked bread in the greased skillet.
  4. Cook the bread on both sides until a light golden brown.
  5. Arrange the cooked French toast on plates and dust with powdered sugar. Add syrup to taste.

 

French Toast Cooked in a Cast Iron Skillet

How To Butterfly A Whole Chicken – Video

A wonderfully easy and frugal meal that I often recommend for feeding a hungry family is cooking a whole chicken. With a few hearty sides, like baked potatoes and a vegetable or salad, a 3 to 4 pound chicken should feed a family of four.

To make roasting a chicken even easier (and faster) I often use a technique in which I “butterfly” the chicken. This is nothing more than flattening the chicken out to make it lay out in the roasting pan. It then roasts more evenly and in less time, and is easier to cut up and serve. Watch this video and the next time you’re struggling with something simple for dinner, give this method a try:
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