How To Clarify Turkey Broth

Hi all. I made two batches of broth from two turkeys – one broth turned out fine but the other one got pretty cloudy. I think the difference was on one I took my time and let it simmer slowly, and the other one I boiled too hard for too long.

Now I’m blessed with one batch of beautiful broth sitting in my freezer and another batch in my refrigerator waiting for some way to ‘fix’ it.

What is the best way to clarify broth? I’ve heard about using egg whites. Has anyone tried that and has it worked?

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below

Trisha - December 4, 2010

Just boil homemade egg noodles in the cloudy broth, the flour cooks out and turns the broth cloudy anyway.

DebraRuegg - December 5, 2010

Regina,Don’t sweat it. if it is tasty,then go ahead and freeze as is
If my broths are too cloudy for recipes needing a clear broth,I go
ahead,freeze it,label for cassaroles etc. where the color doesn’t really matter. I hope this helps.

Shawn - December 8, 2010

Use egg whites to clarify it. By the way usually that just means you have a heartier more flavorful broth. Especially if you used bones when making it.

CS - December 8, 2010

As the other posters mentioned, don’t worry about the cloudy broth. Unless you were going for a consomme, cloudy won’t affect the taste or use of it at all. If it is really important that it be clear, perhaps straining it through a paper coffee filter might remove some of the sediment (which I’m thinking is just bits of meat, veggies — flavor!).

A bit off topic, but I used to make a beef pot roast that had a lot of veggies cooked in with the meat. At the end, to make the gravy, I would puree the cooked veggies in with the broth and meat juices. It looked cloudy, but was incredibly delicious.

BitWrangler Jim - December 8, 2010

My broths aren’t always completely clear, but I get them clearer by straining the liquid through a large, fine-mesh strainer. Then I strain it a second time through cheese cloth in that same strainer. Removes most cloudiness, but I don’t think it makes them completely clear.

Lanette Wagner - December 8, 2010

This may sound crazy but I use paint strainers from the local auto paint supply store. They’re VERY cheap(they might even give you a few for free if you ask politely). They’re a one use throw away so you might have to strain a second time depending on your ingredients. I always end up with perfectly clear broth! BTW-My husband painted cars for a living and HE gave me this suggestion!

Becky - December 9, 2010

Cloudy broths have more flavor and nutrients. It means you probably boiled it too hard for too long, or that the bones were frozen at some point (rather than only refrigerated).

In fact, when I make broth/stock, I pour a splash of vinegar in the water w/ the carcass and veggies. This causes calcium to seep out of the bones into the stock, fortifying it and boosting calcium levels for whatever I make out of the stock. It does make it couldy though. But I’ve never had clear turkey & sausage gumbo, turkey and dumplings, turkey-veg or turkey-noodle soup!

Lori - November 1, 2012

Hi! The best way to prevent this is to skim off the foam as your broth is simmering. I am not sure why this works, but it works for me when I make turkey or chicken broth. I agree with the other posters about this not affecting flavor. I would just enjoy the broth you have made anyway.

Linda - March 11, 2013

Yes. Egg whites work like a charm. I have done it before and was completely amazed that it clarified the broth very quickly and it was beautiful. Now don’t ask me how, because I researched it and did not save the technique. I am making stock now and looking for the technique which is how I found your site.

Leave a Reply: