St. Patrick’s Day Edition – HBHW Newsletter

March 14th 2009

Editorial

Welcome to the special St. Patrick’s Day Edition of the Hillbilly Housewife Newsletter.

This edition looks a little different from our usual newsletter, because it’s focusing strictly on St. Patty Day stuff including some informative articles, and of course plenty of yummy recipes both from me and the HBHW Community.

If you’re looking for some crafty ideas, check out these cute St. Patrick’s Day crafts and activities.

After enjoying a few nice warm days, we are back to cold and rain in these parts. Crafts will come in really handy this weekend to keep us busy. Here are some more easy St. Patrick’s Day crafts for your kids to enjoy.

1. Buy green construction paper and trace shamrocks from either a coloring book or a template online, and make a string of shamrocks to hang in your home.

2. You can’t celebrate the day without hats! You can easily make St. Patrick’s Day hats by using construction paper. While there are tons of templates available online, you can accomplish this task easily. Take two pieces of green construction paper and tape them together forming about a 14” long piece. Fold it into a circle and tape one side to the other. Take another piece of green construction paper to make the top of the hat by using a paper plate to trace a circle. Cut it out and use clear tape to attach it to the top of the hat.

Next, you’ll need to make the brim of the hat. Again, using green construction paper; cut out a larger circle and apply glue so that the hat will attach itself to the brim. Finally, you need the buckle to place just above the brim of the hat. For this you can use brown construction paper and cut a wide strip and glue or tape it to the hat.

That’s it for now.
Warm Regards,

Susanne – The Hillbilly Housewife

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History of St. Patrick’s Day

History cannot say for one hundred percent certainty who the real Saint Patrick was, but he is believed to have been Maewyn Succat, born around 385 AD. Succat, baptized Patricius (or Patrick), was the son of a Roman nobleman, and was born in Scotland. He was kidnapped from his hometown and taken as a slave into Ireland around the age of 16. He escaped to Gaul, at the age of 22, and returned to Scotland. There he followed his father and grandfather into the Celtic Church and later he became a missionary who returned to Ireland.

To learn about the man behind the holiday, one can read Confessio and Epistola, letters he wrote. The first is described as Saint Patrick’s spiritual autobiography. The second is his attempt to right the mistreatment of Irish Christians at the hands of the British. These two works, however, do not teach us enough about the man to know what is true and what is fancy.

Because so little is written about Saint Patrick, there is much that remains unknown about the man. The folklore surrounding him, however, abounds. He is believed to have raised people from the dead. The fact that there are no snakes in Ireland is also attributed to the man, although snakes have never been indigenous to the country. Whatever the folklore, Patrick is said to have lived in Ireland as a missionary for thirty years establishing monasteries and schools wherever he went. He also converted people to Christianity throughout the country.

One of the stories surrounding Saint Patrick is that he won pagan Ireland to Christ by his explanation of the Trinity using a shamrock. His taught, as the story goes, that God is one being, with three separate personalities – Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. As a teaching tool, he plucked a shamrock from the ground and showed the pagans how the shamrock is one plant with three separate leaves.

Historical accounts say that Saint Patrick died on March 17, 460 AD. Bishop Patrick has been liturgically celebrated as a saint soon after his death, despite the fact he has never been formally canonized. It was also around his death that St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated. Although there is no proof that Saint Patrick was associated with the Catholic Church, they have embraced him as their own.

March 17 has been celebrated as Saint Patrick’s Day, many believe, since his death. As Irish people have moved out of their homeland, they have taken their holidays and celebrations with them. Of course, Ireland has the most elaborate St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, but they can be found around the world wherever there are large populations of Irish people.

In the United States, Boston, Massachusetts hosted the first St. Patrick’s Day celebration in 1737. Since that time, large cities throughout America have been adding yearly parades, often coloring their food and beer green. Not to be outdone, in 1965 Chicago, Illinois began coloring the Chicago River green each year to celebrate this Irish-born holiday.


Irish Cooking and Its History

If you want to learn about Irish cuisine, you just have to learn about the people of Ireland because the two are inseparable. Anthropologists have determined that people began living on the Emerald Isle about 8,000 years ago and they lived mainly on what the sea and forests could provide. They also gathered the wild edibles that were available – watercress, berries, nuts, and wild lettuces. They evolved into an agricultural society around 4500 B.C. and began to cultivate oats, barley, and wheat after the British had introduced them to the inhabitants. Soon after, they began to domesticate animals and use them for food. They added milk, butter and cheese to their diets along with the meat from goats, sheep, and cattle.

As today, a good quantity of food would have been cooked during the early gastronomic history of Ireland. Usually food was cooked in a large pot, like a cauldron, that had three legs and that could be placed directly over the fire, left simmering continuously. (This method of cleaning is the basis for the song “Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot, nine days old.”)

Where you lived determined what you would have cooking in your pot. If you lived on the coast, your pot would be full of seafood, seaweed, herbs, and possibly some wild vegetables. If you lived inland, your pot would have contained wild game, vegetables, and herbs.

Another method of cooking, particularly for wild fowl, was to cover the entire bird in a casing of a couple of inches of blue clay. The clay was then put into the hot fire and allowed to bake. When the clay was baked as hard as stone, it was taken out of the fire and broken open. The feathers and skin were easily removed with the clay. You could also find people cooking meat, usually whole animals, on spits over open flames.

Breads, made from eight different grains grown in Ireland, were cooked by placing the cauldron, turned upside down, on top of hot coals or stones. This acted as a basic oven. Because cauldrons were so valuable, and many people didn’t have them, it is likely that bread was placed on hot flagstones and then placed in front of the hearth to cook.

As the Irish began to cultivate crops, one crop that could easily be found was corn. A large part of the corn grown was not used as a food source, but was used for creating ale. The corn ale was mixed with herbs, honey, and spices and was consumed by everyone in the Irish family.

Mead was another alcoholic beverage consumed by the Irish, but it was generally reserved for feasts. Fermenting honey and water then adding herbs and spices made the mead. Additional honey was added to sweeten the mead. Wines made from grapes were not common in Ireland until they were used as a means of trade with the Gauls.

Dairy products – cheese, butter, and milk – were very important in the Irish diet. It would not have been uncommon to find butter and cheese made from sheep’s milk as opposed to cow’s milk.

According to historical accounts, it is unlikely that vegetables played a very large part in the Irish diet prior to the 8th century. If they were used in cooking, the most likely vegetables to be used would have been leeks, onions, nettles, and watercress. They would have used any fruits they could find – sloe berry, raspberry, blackberry, strawberry, and elderberry – would have been gathered from the area. Apples seem to have been the only type of fruit that was cultivated.

Perhaps the most well known of all Irish foods is the potato, which was introduced to Ireland in the 17th century. The potato is believed to be a native of the Americas and has only become a staple in Ireland within the last 300 years. The potato was first introduced to Europe in 1570 by the Spanish who brought it back from their conquests in the New World.

By 1663 the potato was entrenched as a staple of the Irish diet; by 1770 it had become so popular that it had become known as the “Irish Potato.” Families in Ireland depended upon the potato to supplement their meager winter diets. Dependence upon one crop, however, had a detrimental effect on the country and its population.

Although there had been lesser famines in Ireland due to extreme cold weather, blight on the crop caused the “Great Potato Famine” of 1845-1848, causing the deaths of over 1 million people. Approximately 3 million people also emigrated from Ireland during this time period. Following the great famine, however, the potato has remained one of the staple foods on the Irish diet.

Irish Recipes From HBHW Readers

This is a random recipe, but would be good for St. Patrick’s Day too. It is a healthier version of the green watergate salad. My family loves it.

Healthier Watergate Salad

2 cups plain yogurt (fat free works fine)
1 small box instant sugar free pistachio pudding
8 oz fat free cool whip (or sugar free as you choose)
20 oz crushed pineapple

Mix yogurt w/ pudding & pineapple, fold in cool whip. Chill several hours before serving. 8 servings.

Enjoy!
Susan S

My family gets together for St Patty’s Day and we celebrate a few March Birthday’s going on this month. I always make an Irish favorite, Colcannon but I usually get the recipes from different Internet cooking websites. It’s pretty much on all of them and a wide variety of ingredients also. Basically it is just your Plain Old Mashed Potatoes with different add ins. Look It up I’m sure it will be on your next menu, It’s very yummy thanks!!!!

Angela S.
Pennsylvania


More Irish Recipes Perfect For St. Patrick’s Day

Here are quite a few more fun recipes for Patty Day. Enjoy!

Leprechaun Cheese and Onion Dip

  • 1 (15 oz.) jar Cheese Whiz
  • 1/3 C beer
  • 1/2 C onion, finely chopped

Melt the Cheese Whiz in the microwave as directed on the jar label.
Place the melted cheese in a serving bowl.
Stir in the beer until well combined.
Fold the chopped onions into the cheese mixture.
Serve at room temperature or on a warming plate.

Serves: 16

Serve this dip with pretzels, cubes of bread or rye rounds and watch it disappear quickly.

Ladd’s Corned Beef Puffs

  • 1/2 C flour
  • 1/2 C rye flour
  • 2 t parsley flakes
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1/2 t + 1/8 t garlic powder, divided
  • 1 C of water
  • 1/2 C butter
  • 4 large eggs, well beaten
  • 1/4 C caraway seeds
  • 2 (8 oz.) pkgs. cream cheesed softened
  • 1/2 C mayonnaise
  • 1/4 C sour cream
  • 2 T chives, minced
  • 1 t horseradish mustard
  • 2 (2 ½ oz.) pkgs. deli styled corned beef, chopped
  • 10 green olives, chopped

Set the oven temperature to 400 degrees and allow the oven to heat while preparing the puffs.
Place both types of flour in a mixing bowl.
Add the parsley flakes and salt.
Sprinkle in the 1/2 t of the garlic powder.
Toss to combine the ingredients together well then set aside.
Pour the water into a small saucepan.
Add the butter and place the saucepan over medium heat.
Bring the water to a brisk boil and allow the butter to melt.
Carefully add the flour mixture and stir until balls begin to form.
Remove the pan from the heat and carefully stir in the eggs until well combined.
Grease a large cookie sheet well.
Drop the dough mixture by a tablespoon onto the prepared cookie sheet about 2 inches apart.
Sprinkle the caraway seeds over the top of each dough mound.
Bake 18 minutes or until a nice golden brown.
Remove to wire racks and cut a small slit in the side of each puff to allow the steam to escape.
Place the softened cream cheese into a medium size mixing bowl.
Fold in the mayonnaise and sour cream until well combined and the mixture is smooth.
Add the chives and mustard and blend the ingredients together well.
Fold the corned beef into the mixture until completely combined through the mixture.
Add the olives and blend in well.
Cut each puff in half with a sharp knife beginning where you made the original slit.
Spread the filling onto the bottom half of each puff.
Place the top half back on the bottom half of each puff.
Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes before serving.

Serves: 24

If you are cooking corned beef for your dinner use small portion to make this filling instead of the deli corned beef. It will take 1/2 to measure out the same amount. Onions can also be added in place of the olives if you prefer.

Luck of the Irish Kettle Soup

  • 2 T butter
  • 1 1/2 C white onion, chopped
  • 1 C celery, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 8 C chicken broth
  • 1 1/2 C carrots, chopped
  • 4 C cabbage, coarsely chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 t parsley flakes
  • 1/2 t thyme
  • 1/4 t pepper
  • 2 1/2 C cooked corned beef, chopped
  • 1 (14.5 oz.) diced tomatoes with juice
  • 1/4 t salt

Melt the butter in a kettle placed over medium heat.
Add the onion and celery and stir to coat with the butter.
Cook 8 minutes or until the vegetables are fork tender, stiring often.
Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute.
Pour the chicken broth into the kettle.
Carefully stir in the carrots and cabbage.
Add in the bay leaf, parsley, thyme and pepper and stir to incorporate.
Bring the soup to a steady boil.
Once boiling, reduce the heat to medium low and cover the kettle.
Allow the soup to simmer 45 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Up the heat to medium then stir in the corned beef.
As the soup begins to boil carefully add in the tomatoes.
When the soup has returned to a steady boil reduce the heat again to medium low.
Cook uncovered for 15 minutes.
Sprinkle in the salt and stir to combine.

Serves: 8

Corned beef was originally substituted by the Irish Americans for bacon in the late 1800′s. Many believe that eating corned beef with cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day brings good luck throughout the year.

Easy Irish Coddle

  • 1 (1 lb.) pkg. of bacon
  • 2 (1 lb.) pkg. sausage links
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 2 whole garlic cloves
  • 4 large potatoes, peeled and sliced thick
  • 2 carrots, peeled and chunked
  • 1 t salt
  • 1 t pepper
  • 4 C apple cider
  • 2 t parsley flakes

Place the bacon in a skillet positioned over medium heat.
Fry the bacon 10 minutes or until very crisp.
Remove the bacon to a piece of paper towel to drain.
Remove all but 1 T of the bacon drippings from the pan and discard.
Place the sausage links into the skillet with the reserved drippings.
Brown the sausage 8 minutes, turning often to brown all sides.
Remove the sausage and drain on paper towel.
Place the onion and garlic cloves into the drippings in the skillet
Adjust the heat to medium low and cook for 5 minutes or until just beginning to soften.
Crumble the bacon into the bottom of large soup pot.
Place the cooked sausage into the pot with the bacon.
Add the softened onions and garlic cloves.
Place the potatoes and carrots into the pot.
Sprinkle the salt and pepper over the ingredients.
Pour enough of the apple cider over the mixture in the pot to just cover.
Cover the pot and cook over medium low heat for 1 1/2 hours.
Sprinkle the parsley over the soup just before serving.

Serves: 6

Coddle is a traditional Irish dish. It is considered a comfort food in Ireland and is typically eaten during the winter months. Coddle is steamed not boiled so a tight fitting lid on the soup pot is essential. Remember to check your coddle during cooking to ensure it is not boiling. Should it begin to boil, lower your heat to the lowest setting and adjust your cooking time to 2 hours.

End of the Rainbow Golden Soup

  • 2 T butter
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 carrots, sliced
  • 2 potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 4 C vegetable broth
  • 1 C of milk
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1/4 t pepper

Place the butter in a soup kettle over medium heat and allow the butter to melt.
Once the butter has melted add the onion and stir to coat with the butter.
Cook the onion 5 minutes or just until soft.
Add the carrots, potatoes and garlic and stirring often cook for 3 minutes.
Pour the broth into the kettle and stir to combine the ingredients.
Cover the kettle and bring the broth to a brisk boil.
Once boiling, reduce the heat to low and allow the soup to simmer 30 minutes or until the vegetables are fork tender.
Remove the kettle from the heat and use a slotted spoon to remove a quarter of the carrot slices.
A little at time place the soup into the blender and puree until very smooth.
Once all the soup has been pureed return it to the kettle.
Stir the milk into the pureed soup until well combined.
Place the kettle back over low heat and cook, being sure to not let the soup boil,
for 15 minutes or until just heated through.
Once heated through stir in the salt and pepper until well combined.
Pour the soup into bowls then add some of the reserved carrot slices to each bowl.

Serves: 6

By reserving some of the carrots and placing it in the soup when ready to serve everyone can find the gold at the end of the rainbow. Taste the soup before adding the salt and pepper. Many times a vegetable broth will be highly seasoned and salt and pepper may not be needed. You can also substitute chicken broth for the vegetable broth if you prefer.

Irish Brew Potato Soup

  • 2 T butter
  • 1 t garlic
  • 1 C green onions, chopped
  • 1/2 C celery, chopped
  • 6 C white potatoes, peeled, quartered and boiled
  • 3 (12 oz.) cans light beer
  • 1 T sugar
  • 1 chicken bullion cube
  • 1 t salt
  • 1/2 t pepper
  • 8 C chicken broths
  • 4 C cream

Place the butter in a soup kettle over medium heat.
Once the butter has melted add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute.
Add the onions, celery and potatoes and continue to cook for 5 minutes or until fork tender.
Pour the beer into the pot and bring the mixture to a brisk boil.
Once boiling carefully mash the potatoes against the side of the soup kettle then stir to combine.
Stir in the sugar until dissolved.
Add the bouillon cube and stir well so it will begin to dissolve.
Stir in the salt and pepper until well combined.
Pour the chicken broth into the pot and bring the mixture back to a brisk boil.
Cover, reduce the heat to low and simmer 30 minutes or until heated through.
Stir in the cream just before serving.

Serves: 10

If your soup is not as thick as you like add a little arrow root to the boiling broth. Be sure to stir it well and only add a little at time until you have reached the desired thickness.

Tad of Green Irish Salad

  • 1 (6 oz.) pkg. lime gelatin
  • 1 1/2 C boiling water
  • 1 (8 oz.) can crushed pineapple in juice
  • 1 (8 oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened
  • 1 C cottage cheese
  • 1 C whipped topping, thawed
  • 1/2 C walnuts, chopped
  • 1/4 C maraschino cherries, chopped

Place the gelatin powder into a mixing bowl.
Pour the boiling water over the powder and whisk until the powder is completely dissolved.
Fold the pineapple into the gelatin well.
Refrigerate 1 hour or until the gelatin is slightly thickened.
Place the softened cream cheese into a mixing bowl.
Add the cottage cheese and blend until combined together well.
Fold the whipped topping into the mixture and blend until smooth.
Blend in the walnuts and the chopped cherries until combined through the gelatin.
Spray a 6 C gelatin mold with a non stick cooking spray.
Pour the prepared gelatin into the mold evenly.
Refrigerate at least 4 hours or until firm.

Serves: 12

Removing your gelatin from the mold is an easy trick. Place the mold to the rim in warm water for about 15 seconds. Carefully insert your fingers between the mold and the gelatin and slide your fingers around the mold to loosen. Place a serving plate over the top of the mold. Turn the mold upside down and shake carefully to loosen the mold. Remove the mold and center the gelatin mold on the serving plate. If you would like to garnish your mold with a lettuce leaf place the leaf on the plate before positioning it over the mold.

Irish Jig Salad

  • 1 1/2 C boiling water
  • 1 (6 oz.) pkg. lime gelatin
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1 1/2 C of cold water
  • 1 T lemon juice
  • 1/2 C sour cream
  • 1/2 C prepared salad dressing
  • 1 cucumber, peeled, seeded and chopped
  • 2 T white onion, chopped
  • 1 t dill weed

Carefully pour the boiling water into a large mixing bowl.
Add the gelatin powder and salt.
Whisk until the gelatin powder is completely dissolved.
Pour the cold water into the mixture.
Add the lemon juice and stir to combine well.
Refrigerate the gelatin for 1 hour or until just beginning to become thick.
Place the sour cream and salad dressing together in a mixing bowl and blend together.
Add the sour cream mixture to the slightly thick gelatin mixture.
Place the gelatin back in the refrigerator for 15 minutes.
Fold in the cucumber and onion until well combined.
Sprinkle the dill weed into the gelatin mixture and mix to incorporate well.
Spray a 5 C gelatin mold with a non stick cooking spray.
Pour the gelatin mixture into the prepared mold.
Refrigerate 5 hours or until very firm.

Serves: 10

When refrigerating the gelatin the second time to determine if the gelatin is thick enough pull a spoon through from one side to the other. If the spoon leaves an impression in the gelatin it is thick enough to add the remaining ingredients.

Baked Irish Apple Cabbage

  • 1 head of cabbage, chopped
  • 2 C apples, peeled, cored and sliced
  • 1/3 C sugar
  • 1 C bread crumbs
  • 6 T butter, melted

Fill a small saucepan 2/3 full of water and place over high heat.
Allow the water to come to a brisk boil then add the cabbage.
Boil the cabbage 4 minutes or until just beginning to tender.
Drain the cabbage very well.
Spray a 2 qt. casserole dish with a non stick cooking spray.
Heat the oven temperature to 350 degrees.
Layer half of the cabbage into the prepared casserole dish.
Layer half of the apple slices over the top of the cabbage.
Sprinkle half the sugar over the top of those 2 layers.
Spread half of the bread crumbs over that.
Repeat the layers again ending with the last of the bread crumbs.
Pour the melted butter over the top of the entire casserole.
Cover tightly and bake for 30 minutes.
Remove the cover and continue baking an additional 15 minutes or until heated through.

Serves: 4

Sprinkle each layer of apples with a little cinnamon before sprinkling on the sugar.

Devilish St Patrick Eggs

  • 8 hard boiled eggs, peeled and rinsed
  • 1/2 C sandwich spread
  • 1 T parsley flakes

Cut the eggs in half lengthwise and remove the yolks.
Place the yolks in a bowl and mash well with a fork.
Add the sandwich spread to the mashed yolks and stir to combine.
Fill each egg white half with the yolk mixture.
Sprinkle the tops with the parsley.

Serves: 8

If you have family member especially children who just won’t eat egg yolks no matter how you fix them try this variation. Fill a few of the egg whites with plain sandwich spread instead of the egg yolk mixture. You can also top these eggs with fine diced pickles, sweet or dill, if you like.

Cheesy Ale Loaf

  • 1/2 C warm (105 to 115 degrees) ale
  • 2 T sugar
  • 1 T of yeast
  • 2 1/2 C of flour
  • 1 (4 oz) pkg. extra sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 1/2 C non fat instant dry milk powder
  • 3/4 t salt
  • 3/4 t dry mustard powder
  • 1 egg, well beaten
  • 1 small egg white
  • 1/2 T sesame seeds

Pour the warm ale into a mixing bowl.
Sprinkle in the sugar and yeast and stir until completely dissolved.
Allow the mixture to stand in the bowl for 5 minutes.
Place 2 C of the flour into a separate bowl.
Add the cheese, milk powder, salt and mustard powder.
Stir gently to combine.
Add in the beaten egg and mix until well combined.
Stir the flour mixture into the yeast mixture.
Continue mixing, with your hands, until a soft dough forms.
Sprinkle a little of the remaining flour onto a flat surface.
Place the dough on the flour and knead with your hands for 10 minutes.
Add flour to the surface as necessary to keep the dough from sticking.
The dough should be smooth and have an elastic consistency when ready.
Spray a baking sheet with a non stick cooking spray.
Form the dough into a round loaf and place on the prepared baking sheet.
Brush the top of the loaf with the egg white.
Sprinkle the sesame seeds evenly over the top of the loaf.
Cut criss cross patterns about 1/8 in. deep in 4 places in the top of the loaf with a sharp knife.
Cover the loaf with a kitchen towel, place in a warm draft free area and allow the loaf to rise to double its size, about 1 1/2 to 2 hours.
Allow the oven to preheat to 375 degrees.
Bake the bread 20 minutes or until it makes a hollow sound when thumped with a finger on the top.
Cool on a wire rack before cutting.

Serves: 1 loaf
Ireland’s Sweet Milk Bread

  • 2 C of white flour
  • 1 1/2 t salt
  • 1 1/2 t baking soda
  • 4 C wheat flour
  • 2 C of sweet milk

Place the white flour into a large mixing bowl.
Add the salt and baking soda and toss to combine well.
Dump the wheat flour into the mixture and using your hands mix until all the ingredients are incorporated together well.
Make a well in the middle of the flour mixture.
Pour the sweet milk into the well slowly.
Use a wooden spoon and mix the dough while adding the milk.
It may take a little less milk or just a little more depending on the type of flour used but when the dough is ready it should be soft but easy to manage.
Once the dough is ready lightly flour your hands and knead it in the bowl until you have formed a ball.
Lightly flour a flat surface and press the dough into a circle that is 1 1/2 inches thick.
Flour a table knife and cut an x pattern into the middle of the dough so that when baked the bread will break easily into 4 quarters.
Place the dough on an ungreased cookie sheet in a preheated 425 degree oven for 25 minutes.
Reduce the oven heat to 350 degrees and continue baking for 15 minutes.
Remove and allow the bread to cool at least 4 hours before cutting.

Serves: 8

Sweet milk is whole milk that has not been processed. Many grocery stores sell sweet milk in their dairy sections. If you can’t find sweet milk at your local grocery store buttermilk will work just as well. If the crust on your bread seems to hard, wrap it in a damp kitchen towel until it has completely cooled. This will soften the crust and make it much easier to cut.

Irish Gold Soda Bread

What You Need:

3 3/4 C of flour
1/4 C brown sugar
1 T baking powder
1 t baking soda
3/4 C golden raisins
2 C of buttermilk
1 egg

How to Make It:

Allow the oven to heat up to 375 degrees.
Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and set aside.
Place the flour into a large mixing bowl.
Dump in the brown sugar, baking powder and baking soda and toss to combine well.
Fold in the raisins until incorporated into the dry mixture well.
Pour the buttermilk into a separate small bowl.
Break the egg into the buttermilk and whisk until completely combined.
Pour the mixture into the dry ingredients and stir until all the ingredients are incorporated together and soft dough has formed.
Flour a flat surface lightly and transfer the dough to the surface.
Knead the dough 10 times or until the dough is pliable and smooth.
Form the dough into a large mounded round.
Place the dough on the prepared cookie sheet and use a sharp knife to cut a shallow X in the middle of the mound.
Bake the bread for 45 minutes or until browned on top and a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

Serves: 10

Cutting the shallow X in the top of the dough before baking allows the bread to expand instead of cracking during the baking process. If you are not fond of raisins try dried currants or dried cranberries instead.

Potato Bread from the Stove

  • 1 lb. white potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 2 C of flour
  • 1 1/2 t baking powder
  • 1/2 t baking soda
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/4 C fresh parsley, chopped
  • 4 T butter, divided
  • 1 C of buttermilk
  • 1 egg

Place the potatoes into a saucepan and cover them with water.
Place the pan over medium high heat and bring the water to a brisk boil.
Cook the potatoes in the boiling water for 4 minutes or until crisp tender.
Drain the potatoes well and set them aside to cool.
Place the flour, baking powder, soda, salt and parsley into a large mixing bowl.
Add all but 2 t of the butter and cut it into the dry ingredients with a pastry blender until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
Pour the buttermilk into a separate bowl.
Whisk in the egg until well combined.
Pour the mixture into the dry ingredients and mix until completely combined.
Place the remaining 2 t of butter into a skillet over medium heat.
Allow the butter to melt completely then add the potatoes and stir to coat.
Flour your hands and form the dough into a ball.
Separate the ball into thirds.
Mix one third of the dough into the potatoes in the skillet
Flour a flat surface and lay the remaining dough on the flour.
Shape the dough into a flat circle that will fit into the skillet.
Press the dough round into the skillet over the potato mixture.
Cut 6 wedges into the top of the dough being careful to not cut all the way through.
Place a tight lid over the skillet and cook the bread over medium heat for 18 minutes or until the dough has firmed.
Set the oven on broil.
Remove the skillet lid and place the skillet into the broil.
Broil the bread for about 3 minutes or until a golden brown.

Serves: 6

A cast iron skillet is the best type to use to make this bread.
Easy Soda Raisin Muffins

  • 1 C + 2 tbsp flour
  • 1/4 C + 1 t sugar, divided
  • 1 t baking powder
  • 1/4 t baking soda
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1/2 C sour cream
  • 2 T of vegetable oil
  • 2 T egg, beaten
  • 1/3 C raisins

Dump the flour in a mixing bowl.
Add 1/4 C sugar and toss to combine.
Toss in the baking powder, soda and salt until thoroughly blended.
In a different bowl place the sour cream.
Pour in the vegetable oil and add the egg.
Whisk until the ingredients are combined together well and smooth.
Stir the sour cream mixture into the flour mixture just until the dry ingredients are moistened.
Fold in the raisins being sure they are incorporated well into the batter.
Set the oven temperature to 400 degrees and allow the oven to heat while finishing the muffins.
Line a muffin tin with six paper liners.
Fill each muffin cup half full of the batter.
Sprinkle the top of each one with the remaining sugar.
Bake 15 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.
Allow the muffins to cool 5 minutes before removing to a rack to cool to desired temperature.

Serves: 6

You don’t have to save these goodies jut for St. Patrick’s Day. Add blueberries or dried cranberries instead of the raisins. They make the perfect breakfast muffin.

St Paddy’s Leg of Lamb

  • 2 T lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 1/2 t dried rosemary
  • 1 t dried thyme
  • 1 t salt
  • 1/2 t pepper
  • 1 (5 lb.) leg of lamb

Pour the lemon juice into a mixing bowl.
Whisk in the minced garlic, rosemary and thyme.
Add the salt and pepper and whisk again to completely combine the ingredients.
Place the oven temperature on 325 and allow the oven to heat up.
Rub the mixture over the entire leg of lamb.
Place a wire rack into a deep baking pan.
Place the leg of lamb on the rack fat side up.
Roast the lamb for 2 hours or until a thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the meat reaches between 145 and 165 degrees.

Serves: 4

This makes the perfect main course for your St. Patrick’s Day dinner. Add some mashed potatoes and cabbage with apples to the meal and enjoy.

Shenanigan’s Irish Stew

  • 2 T canola oil
  • 1 1/2 lbs. boneless round steak, cut into chunks
  • 2 T flour
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 (14 1/2 oz.) can beef broth
  • 1 (14 1/2 oz.) stewed tomatoes
  • 1 envelope garlic and herb dressing mix
  • 3 white potatoes cut into chunks
  • 3 carrots cut into chunks

Place the oil into a Dutch oven over medium high heat.
Allow the oil to heat up but not smoke.
Place the flour in a shallow bowl.
Coat the meat thoroughly with the flour.
Place the meat in the hot oil.
Stir the onion into the hot oil to coat.
Cook, stirring occasionally, about 12 minutes or until the meat is browned and the onion is tender.
Pour the broth into the pot once the meat has browned.
Add in the stewed tomatoes.
Sprinkle the dressing mix into the pot and stir to combine all the ingredients together well.
Bring the mixture to a full steady boil.
Reduce the heat to low and cover the pot.
Simmer the mixture for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally so that meat does not stick.
Add the potatoes and carrots to the pot after 30 minutes.
Recover and continue cooking an additional 30 minutes.
Remove the lid and continue cooking 15 minutes or until the meat is tender and the sauce has thickened to your liking.

Serves: 6

To make this recipe a full meal deal cook 3 C of egg noodles according to the package directions. Spoon the stew over the noodles on serving plates. Sprinkle with a little parsley to garnish each serving.

Irish River Poached Salmon

  • 2 lbs. center cut fresh salmon
  • Salt
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 2 t cold water
  • 1 stick of butter, chopped into pieces
  • 1 t lemon juice

Place the salmon in a saucepan that just barely holds the fish.
Fill the saucepan half full of water.
Add 1 T of salt for every 4 C of water added to the saucepan.
Place the pan over medium heat and bring the water to a boil.
Cover the pan, reduce the heat to low and simmer the fish for 20 minutes.
Turn the heat off from under the saucepan and allow the pan to set undisturbed for 15 minutes.
Place the egg yolks in a saucepan over low heat.
Add the water and whisk briskly until incorporated together well.
Continuously whisking add the butter piece by piece.
Keep whisking until the sauce thickens to a coating consistency.
If the sauce begins to scramble or is too thick remove the pan from the heat and add a little more cold water then continue whisking until the sauce reaches the right thickness.
If the sauce doesn’t seem to thicken raise the heat up just slightly.
Once the sauce is thick stir the lemon juice into the mixture.
Remove the salmon from the water.
Remove the skin and place on a serving dish.
Pour the sauce over the top of the salmon just before serving.

Serves: 8

Salmon is a favorite of the Irish and can be found in numbers in the Irish river. Be sure to use a saucepan that the fish just fits into. If poached in a pan that is too large the salmon will loose much of its flavor in the water during simmering. Also remember to keep whisking the sauce continuously while it’s cooking. This will keep the sauce from becoming to thick or scrambling and becoming lumpy.

Irish Tradition Pie

  • 2 C roast lamb, cooked and chopped
  • 1 T onion, chopped very fine
  • 2 C lamb gravy
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/2 t pepper
  • 2 C prepared mashed potatoes, divided
  • 1 T of butter
  • 1/8 t paprika

Turn the oven temperature to 400 degrees and allow the oven to heat.
Place the chopped meat in a mixing bowl.
Add the onion and gravy and stir to combine.
Sprinkle in the salt and pepper and stir again being sure it is combined well.
Butter the bottom of a large baking dish.
Spread 1 C of mashed potatoes evenly into the dish.
Spread all of the meat mixture over the potatoes.
Top the meat with the remaining potatoes being sure to go to the edges of the dish.
Dot the butter over the potatoes in 4 to 6 places.
Sprinkle the paprika over the entire casserole.
Bake 30 minutes or until the potatoes are a golden brown.

Serves: 4

The Irish tradition is to make this pie with lamb. If you prefer chopped beef and/or beef gravy can used in place of the lamb.

Traditional Irish Slow Cooker Meal

  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 4 carrots, diced into chunks
  • 2 white potatoes, quartered
  • 1 (1 lb.) corned beef brisket with spice packet
  • 1/3 C apple juice, unsweetened
  • 2 cloves
  • 1 T brown sugar
  • 1/2 t orange peel, grated
  • 1/2 t mustard
  • 1 cabbage, wedged

Place the onion into the bottom of a 3 qt. size slow cooker.
Place the carrots and then the potatoes over the onion.
Lay the brisket over the top of the vegetables.
Pour the apple juice into a separate bowl.
Add the cloves, brown sugar, orange peel, mustard and spice packet.
Whisk until the ingredients are completely combined.
Pour the mixture over the brisket in the slow cooker.
Cover and cook on high 4 hours.
Add the cabbage wedges to the slow cooker.
Recover and continue cooking 30 minutes or until the meat and vegetables are tender.
Remove the cloves before serving.

Serves: 2

This is a traditional good luck meal that is served on St. Patrick’s Day. This version of an old favorite makes quick work of a delicious meal. If you want to make it for a larger group just double your ingredients and use a 5 or 6 qt. slow cooker.

A Tad of Irish Melt

  • 2 1/2 T butter, room temperature and divided
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 2 C coleslaw mix
  • 1/4 C mayonnaise
  • 4 slices of rye bread
  • 1 1/2 t brown mustard
  • 1/8 t thyme
  • 8 slices of corn beef
  • 8 slices of sharp cheddar cheese

Place 1 T of the butter in a large skillet and place the skillet over medium heat.
Add the onion to the melted butter and sauté 5 minutes or until just beginning to brown.
Add the coleslaw mix to the skillet and cook 3 minutes or until the color turns a very bright green.
Remove the skillet from the stove.
Stir in the mayonnaise making sure the slaw is covered well.
Allow the broiler to heat up.
Place the slices of rye bread on a broiler pan in a single layer.
Broil 2 minutes or until toasted being careful not to burn the bread edges.
Flip and broil another 2 minutes or until toasted.
Remove the bread and set aside.
Place the remaining butter into a small bowl.
Add the mustard and thyme and stir until well combined.
Spread one side of each slice of bread with the mustard mixture.
Add the coleslaw mixture to each slice over the mustard.
Lay 2 pieces of corn beef onto each melt.
Top with 2 slices of cheese per piece of bread.
Broil 3 minutes or until the sandwich is hot and the cheese is melted.

Serves: 4

Corn beef is cured in brine that has been seasoned with herbs and salt. There is no corn in corn beef the salt is what gives it the name. It originates in old England where corn was another word for granule which in this instance is the salt. Swiss cheese can also be used on this melt for more of Rueben taste.

Lucky Irish Potato Mash

  • 2 lb. white potatoes, peeled and cut into quarters
  • 1 lb. apples, peeled, cored and sliced
  • 1 T sugar
  • 4 T butter

Place the potatoes into a large saucepan.
Fill the saucepan with just enough water to cover the potatoes.
Place the saucepan over medium heat.
Bring the water to a brisk boil.
Allow the potatoes to cook 10 minutes or until fork tender.
Place the apples in a separate saucepan.
Place 1 T of water in with the apples.
Sprinkle the sugar over the top of the apples.
Place over medium heat and allow the apples to cook 8 minutes or until tender.
Drain the potatoes well and mash with a potato masher.
Add the cooked apples to the mashed potatoes.
Add the butter and stir until completely combined.

Serves: 4

Serve this as a side dish with lamb or salmon. Garnish the top with crumbled bacon and parsley.


Bit O’ the Irish Parsnips

  • 2 1/2 lbs. parsnips, peeled
  • 3 T chicken broth
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/4 t pepper
  • 4 T butter
  • 1 t parsley

Remove any woody cores from the parsnips then cut into quarters.
Place the parsnips into a large saucepan and cover with water.
Place the saucepan over high heat and bring the water to a brisk boil.
Reduce the heat to medium and cook the parsnips 15 minutes or until fork tender.
Run the parsnips under cool water and then drain them well.
Place the oven temperature on 350 degrees and allow it to heat while preparing the dish.
Place the drained parsnips into a baking dish.
Pour the chicken broth over the parsnips.
Sprinkle in the salt and pepper being sure to cover the parsnips well.
Dot the top of the parsnips with butter.
Bake 30 minutes in the preheated oven or until fork tender.
Remove and sprinkle the parsley over the top just before serving.

Serves: 6

Parsnips are a root vegetable related to the carrot. They have a pale yellow to white color and the flavor is much stronger than the carrots. Parsnips are a favorite with the Irish. Most grocery stores carry them in their produce section.

Emerald Isle Cheese Cabbage

  • 8 slices of bacon
  • 1 head of cabbage
  • 1 T of bacon drippings
  • 3 T butter
  • 1/4 C flour
  • 2 C of warm milk
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/2 t pepper
  • 1 (4 oz.) pkg. cheddar cheese

Place the bacon in a skillet set over medium heat.
Cook the bacon 10 minutes or until crisp.
Place the bacon on paper towel to drain and cool.
Separate the cabbage into 4 wedges.
Place the cabbage wedges into a large saucepan and cover completely with water.
Place the pan over medium high heat and bring the water to a brisk boil.
Cook the cabbage for 10 minutes or until tender.
Drain the cabbage well in a colander while making the cheese sauce.
Remove all the bacon drippings except the 1 T.
Add the butter to the skillet with the drippings.
Allow the butter to melt completely.
Sprinkle the flour into the mixture and stir continuously until the flour is incorporated into the mixture.
Pour the milk into the mixture and stir until smooth and thickened to your liking.
Sprinkle in the salt and pepper and stir to combine well.
Sprinkle the cheese into the mixture and continue cooking, stirring often, until the cheese is completely melted, about 6 minutes.
Place the drained cabbage into a serving bowl.
Pour the cheese mixture over the top of the cabbage.
Crumble the bacon and sprinkle it over the top of the cabbage and cheese sauce.

Serves: 4

When adding flour to a hot butter mixture always be sure to sprinkle it through the mixture instead of just dumping it in. This will keep the flour from clumping. Also be sure to stir the flour in briskly. This will also help to moisten all the flour and make it easier to combine with the butter mixture.

Pot O’ Gold Colcannon

  • 1 lb. cabbage, wedged
  • 1 lb. white potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • 2 leeks
  • 1 C of milk
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/2 t pepper
  • 1/2 C butter

Place the cabbage in a large saucepan and cover well with water.
Place the pan over medium heat and bring the water to a rapid boil.
Cook the cabbage in the boiling water for 10 minutes or until fork tender.
Drain well, place in a warm bowl and set aside.
Place the potatoes in the saucepan and cover with water.
Place the pan back over the medium heat and bring the water to a boil.
Cook the potatoes 12 minutes or until very tender.
Drain the potatoes well then mash them with a potato masher or electric mixer.
Chop the leeks using both the white and green parts of the leeks.
Place the leeks in a small saucepan.
Pour the milk in with the leeks.
Place over low heat and simmer the leeks for 5 minutes or until soft.
Pour the leeks and milk over the potatoes and stir to combine.
Chop the cabbage and add it to the potato mixture.
Sprinkle the salt and pepper into the mixture and stir the ingredients together until completely combined.
Make a well in the middle of the mixture and add the butter into the well.
Fold the ingredients over the butter and stir until the butter has completely melted.

Serves: 6

Colcannon is an Irish dish that was original served on Halloween. The Irish would place small coin prizes into the colcannon as a Halloween surprise. This dish has become popular in many countries and includes many different ingredients in some areas. A dark kale can be used instead of the cabbage in this Irish tradition.

Shamrock Skillet Slaw

  • 1/4 C butter
  • 1/2 t season salt
  • 1 head of cabbage, shredded
  • 1/4 white onion, chopped
  • 3 T of vinegar
  • 1 T sugar

Place the butter in a large skillet over medium high heat.
Allow the butter to completely melt.
Stir the season salt into the butter.
Add the cabbage and onion and stir to coat with the butter.
Reduce the heat to medium, cover the skillet and cook 15 minutes being sure to stir often.
Pour the vinegar into a small bowl.
Add the sugar and whisk until the sugar has dissolved.
Pour the mixture over the cabbage mixture and stir to combine all the ingredients together well.
Continue cooking an additional 5 minutes or until the vinegar mixture is heated through.

Serves: 6

Shredded carrots can also be added to this simple recipe.

Home Made Irish Slaw

  • 2 white potatoes, peeled and sliced
  • 1 small head of cabbage, cored and shredded
  • 1 carrot, shredded
  • 4 scallions (green part only) chopped
  • 2 T of white vinegar
  • 1 1/2 t dry mustard powder
  • 1 t sugar
  • 1 t salt
  • 1/2 t pepper
  • 1 T of canola oil
  • 1/4 C buttermilk

Place the potato slices into a saucepan.
Cover the potatoes with water and place the pan over medium high heat.
Allow the water to come to a brisk boil.
Continue cooking the potatoes for 5 minutes or just until they are beginning to tender.
Drain the potatoes well and set aside.
Place the cabbage, shredded carrot and scallions into a large mixing bowl and toss to combine.
Pour the vinegar into a separate bowl.
Add the mustard powder, sugar, salt and pepper and whisk until well combined.
Add the oil and whisk again until well combined.
Pour the mixture over the vegetables.
Add the potato slices and with your hand toss the mixture until all the vegetables are covered with the sauce well.
Cover the bowl and allow the slaw to set 10 minutes or until the cabbage just begins to wilt.
Pour the buttermilk over the vegetables and recover the bowl.
Chill in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour but no more than 6 hours.

Serves: 16

Be sure to use fresh cabbage and a fresh carrot when making this slaw. The slaw tastes best when the cabbage and carrot have a crunch to them. Do not refrigerate more than 6 hours or the buttermilk will soak into the vegetables and make them mushy.

Irish Eyes are Smiling Red Potatoes

  • 12 small red potatoes
  • 1/4 C olive oil
  • 1/4 C butter, melted
  • 1 t salt
  • 1 t garlic powder
  • 1 t dried basil
  • 1/2 t dried thyme
  • 1/2 t pepper

Set the oven temperature to 350 degrees and let it preheat.
Peel a strip from the middle of each potato all the way around the potato.
Place the potatoes into an ungreased 3 qt. baking dish.
Pour the olive oil into a small mixing bowl.
Add the butter and stir to slightly combine.
Sprinkle in the salt, garlic powder, basil, thyme and pepper.
Whisk until the ingredients are combined together well.
Pour the mixture over the potatoes.
Bake 50 minutes or until the potatoes are fork tender being sure to stir about every 12 minutes or so.

Serves: 6

These little gems are easy to make and taste great. By peeling one strip from the middle of the potato the seasonings can soak into the potato making every bite tasteful.

Celtic Broasted Potatoes

  • 2 T of olive oil
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/4 t pepper
  • 1 t parsley
  • 1 t chives
  • 4 white potatoes, wedged

Allow the oven temperature to rise to 400 degrees.
Pour the olive oil into a shallow bowl large enough to hold a potato wedge.
Sprinkle the salt and pepper into the oil.
Add the parsley and chives to the bowl.
Whisk until the ingredients are combined together well.
Roll each potato wedge in the mixture being sure to cover completely.
Place the potato wedges on a baking sheet in a single layer.
Bake 25 minutes or until a golden brown, being sure to turn occasionally for even browning.

Serves: 4

Add a little grated Parmesan cheese or dry mustard to the coating mix for different taste.

Dublin Chocolate Mint Milk

  • 4 C of milk
  • 1/2 C pistachio flavor instant pudding powder
  • 4 chocolate covered mint sandwich cookies, crushed

Pour 1 C of milk into 4 tall glasses.
Stir 2 T of the pudding powder into each glass until completely dissolved.
Place 1/4 of the crushed cookies into each glass.

Serves: 4

To crush the cookies place those in a freezer bag that seals tight. Use the bottom of glass to crush the cookies as small as you like. Regular chocolate sandwich cookies can be used in place of the mint cookies.

O’Casey Punch

  • 1 (12 oz.) can frozen limeade concentrate, thawed
  • 1 qt. lime sherbet
  • 1 (2 L) bottle lemon-lime flavored soda
  • 4 C crushed ice

Pour the limeade concentrate into a large punch bowl.
Add the sherbet and stir until smooth and well combined.
Pour the soda into the mixture and stir to combine.
Gently stir in the crushed ice just before serving.

Serves: 12

This refreshing punch has pretty green foam that covers the top. This is a very refreshing punch to serve at your St. Patrick’s Day celebration.

Bailey’s Coffee Express

  • 6 oz. hot brewed coffee
  • 1 t brown sugar
  • 1 oz. Irish whisky
  • 1/2 oz. Baileys Irish cream
  • Heavy cream

Pour the hot coffee into a 6 oz. mug.
Add the brown sugar and stir being sure hte sugar is completely dissolved.
Pour the whisky and the Irish cream into the mug and stir to combine.
Float the heavy cream on the top.

Serves: 1

To float the cream hold a teaspoon upside down and pour the cream over the spoon on to the coffee. This will cause the cream to float and there is no need to whip it.

Frothy Irish Coffee Cooler

  • 2/3 C cold Irish coffee
  • 1/3 C Irish coffee creamer
  • 1 t sugar
  • 3 ice cubes
  • 1 T sweetened whipped cream

Place the coffee into the blender.
Add the creamer and sugar.
Top it with the ice cubes.
Blend until the ice is crushed and the mixture is frothy.
Pour into a tall glass and top with sweetened whip cream.

Serves: 1

Your favorite black coffee can be substituted for the Irish coffee. You can also use your favorite flavored creamer if you prefer.

Lucky Day Cinnamon Scones

  • 1 C of self rising flour
  • 1/8 t salt
  • 2 T butter
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 3/4 C buttermilk
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 t cinnamon
  • 2 T sugar

Allow the oven to heat to 425 degrees.
Place the flour and the salt into a sifter and sift together into a large mixing bowl.
Work the butter into the mixture with your hands until completely combined.
Make a well in the center of the mixture.
Add the egg and pour in 1/2 C of the buttermilk.
Use your hands and work the mixture into soft dough adding the remaining buttermilk as needed.
Lightly flour a flat surface and place the dough on the flour.
Roll the dough with a lightly floured rolling pin until it is 1 inch thick.
Use a round cookie cutter and cut out 16 two inch round pieces.
Brush each round with the egg white.
Place the cinnamon in a shaker or small bowl.
Add the sugar and shake or mix until completely combined.
Shake the cinnamon sugar mixture over each scone.
Bake 18 minutes or until a golden brown.

Serves: 8

Self rising soda bread flour works best in this recipe if you can find it. If not any self rising flour will work too.

St. Patrick’s Irish Whisky Balls

  • 3 ½ C vanilla wafer cookies, crushed
  • 1 C pecans, chopped very fine
  • 1 1/2 cups confectioner’s sugar, divided
  • 1/3 C Irish whisky
  • 3 T instant coffee powder
  • 1/3 C light corn syrup

Place the crushed cookies into a mixing bowl.
Add the pecans and toss to combine.
Pour 1 C of the sugar into the mixture and stir to combine well.
Place the whisky into a mixing bowl.
Add the coffee powder and stir until completely dissolved.
Pour the mixture into the cookie mixture.
Add the corn syrup and blend the ingredients together well.
Line a cookie sheet with wax paper.
Form the mixture into balls and place on the wax paper.
Pour the remaining sugar into a shallow bowl.
Roll the coffee balls through the sugar being sure to coat them well.
Allow the balls to stand 15 minutes then store in an airtight container.

Serves: 32 approximately depending on how large you make each ball

These little gems become more flavorful the longer they set. Make them ahead of time and store them for 2 to 3 days to get the full flavor. Give them more of a St. Patrick’s Day look by rolling them in green tinted sugar crystals instead of the confectioners’ sugar.

Erin Go Bragh Pie

  • 2/3 C cold water
  • 2 envelopes unflavored gelatin powder
  • 2 T sugar
  • 2 t instant coffee
  • 2 t Irish whiskey
  • 1 t vanilla
  • 2 C coffee flavored ice cream, softened
  • 11/2 C whipped topping, thawed
  • 1 (6 oz.) prepared chocolate pie crust

Pour the cold water into a small saucepan.
Sprinkle the gelatin powder into the cold water.
Let the gelatin stand in the water for 1 minute without disturbing it.
Place the pan over low heat and cook for 5 minutes, stirring continuously, until the gelatin has completely dissolved.
Add in the sugar and coffee and stir until completely dissolved.
Remove the pan from the heat and blend in the whisky.
Add the vanilla and stir well to combine.
Place the ice cream into the blender.
Cover and blend until the ice cream becomes very smooth.
Add the gelatin mixture and continue blending until mixed into the ice cream well.
Pour the mixture into a bowl and allow it to stand 2 minutes or until the mixture mounds when dropped with a spoon.
Fold in the whipped topping until completely blended in.
Spread the mixture into the prepared pie crust evenly.
Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours or until firm.

Serves: 8

Garnish the top of your pie with some green mints that have been coarsely crushed. Any leftovers must be stored in the refrigerator and are good for up to 2 days.

Green Clover Pie

  • 1 qt. vanilla ice cream, softened
  • 1 (12 oz.) can frozen limeade, thawed
  • 2 drops green food coloring
  • 1 (6 oz.) graham cracker pie crust

Place the softened ice cream in a large mixing bowl.
Pour the limeade in with the ice cream.
Add the food coloring using more if you want a darker green color.
Use an electric mixer on medium speed and beat the mixture until well combined.
Spoon the mixture evenly into the pie crust.
Cover and freeze until firm between 2 and 4 hours.
Let stand at room temperature 10 minutes before cutting.

Serves: 8

Top this pie with some whipped topping and crushed green peppermint candies for a perfect ending to your St. Patrick’s Day meal.

Ireland’s Pudding Cake

  • 1 pkg. yellow cake mix
  • 1 (3.4 oz.) pkg. pistachio instant pudding and pie filling
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 C of water
  • 1/4 C canola oil
  • 1/2 t peppermint extract
  • 8 drops green food coloring
  • 1 (8 sq.) pkg. semi sweet chocolate, chopped
  • 20 chocolate covered thin mint candies

Set the oven temperature to 350 degrees and allow the oven to heat up while making the cake.
Dump the cake mix and the pudding mix together into a large mixing bowl.
Break the eggs into the mix.
Pour in the water and canola oil.
Add the extract and the food coloring.
Beat with an electric mixer on medium speed for 4 1/2 minutes.
Fold the chopped chocolate into the batter.
Grease and flour a large rectangular baking pan being sure to shake out any excess flour.
Spread the batter evenly into the pan.
Bake 40 minutes or until the cake begins to pull away from the sides of the pan and a toothpick inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean.
Place the candies on the top of the baked cake in a single layer.
Return the cake to oven to bake an additional 3 minutes or until the candy has just begun to melt.
Remove the cake and use a rubber spatula to spread the melted candy over the top of the cake like icing.
Cool to room temperature before cutting.

Serves: 15

If you cake mix already has pudding in it cut your water amount down to 3/4 of a cup. Save time on chopping that chocolate by using 1 1/2 C of semi sweet chocolate chunks.

Lucky Cookie Pops

  • 20 vanilla wafers
  • 1/2 C smooth peanut butter
  • 10 Wooden ice cream sticks
  • 1 (12 oz.) bag white chocolate chips
  • 4 drops green food coloring
  • Green decorating sugar
  • Wax paper

Spread each of the vanilla wafer cookies on one side with the peanut butter.
Place a wooden ice cream stick half way up the cookie in the peanut butter on half of the cookies.
Take the other cookies and place peanut butter side down on top of the wooden stick.
Melt the white chocolate chips in the microwave as directed on the package.
Place the green food coloring into the melted chocolate and stir to combine.
Dip each cookie pop into the chocolate being sure to cover completely.
Lay on the wax paper.
Place the cookie pops in the refrigerator until set about 2 hours.

Serves: 10

There are many variations to this cookie pop. Make four leaf clovers by cutting green gum drops in half and positioning them into a leaf form on the chocolate.
Pot O’ Gold can be made by cutting a yellow Dot candy in half and placing it on the chocolate before it sets. Place 3 yellow Nerds above the gold pot to represent the gold coins in the pot. Leprechauns can also be made with these little wonders. Use a yellow gumdrop cut in half to make the beard. Add chocolate sprinkles to the top for the Leprechauns hair and attach a half of green gum drop to the very top before the chocolate firms for his hat.

Frosty Chocolate Cookie Shamrocks

  • 6 tbsp butter, at room temperature
  • 3/4 C sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/2 t milk
  • 3/4 t vanilla
  • 1 1/3 C of flour
  • 1/4 C baking cocoa
  • 1 1/4 t baking powder
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 2 C mint chocolate chip ice cream, softened

Place the butter into a mixing bowl.
Add the sugar and use an electric mixer on medium speed to cream the ingredients together.
Add the egg, milk and flour and stir until well combined.
Place the flour into a separate bowl.
Add the baking cocoa and baking powder.
Sprinkle in the salt and toss to combine ingredients together well.
Slow add the dry ingredients to the creamed mixture and blend together until the dry ingredients are just moistened.
Divide the dough into two equal sections then flatten both sections.
Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour or until the dough is firm.
Allow the oven to heat to 350 degrees while finishing the cookie preparation.
Flour a flat surface lightly and place the sections of flattened firm dough onto the surface.
Use a shamrock cookie cutter and cut the dough out into cookie pieces.
Place the pieces on a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper in a single layer.
Prick each cookie in the middle with a fork.
Bake 8 minutes or until set.
Allow the cookies to cool 2 minutes then transfer to a wire rack to completely cool to room temperature.
Spread six cooled cookies with the ice cream using about 1/4 C for each cookie.
Top the ice cream with the remaining 6 cookies.
Wrap each cookie individually in plastic wrap and freeze for 1 hour or until the ice cream is solid.

Serves: 6

Leprechaun Nibblers

  • 1/4 C unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1/4 C sugar
  • 1 T egg, well beaten
  • 1/2 t vanilla extract
  • 1/2 C + 1 t flour
  • 1/4 t baking powder
  • 1/8 t salt
  • 2 1/4 C of confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 T + 1 t powdered egg whites
  • 3 T water
  • 4 drops green food coloring

Place the butter into a mixing bowl.
Add the sugar and beat on medium speed with an electric mixer until fluffy.
Beat in the egg and the vanilla.
Place the flour into a sifter.
Add the baking powder and salt to the sifter.
Sift the ingredients into the bowl with the butter mixture.
Place the mixer speed on low and mix until the dough is well blended.
Lightly flour a flat surface and turn the dough onto the surface.
Place a little flour on your hands and knead the dough gently for 30 seconds.
Shape the dough into a round disk, cover with plastic wrap and chill for at least 2 hours.
Remove the chilled dough and allow it to set at room temperature for 10 minutes.
Allow the oven to heat to 350 degrees while cutting the cookies.
Very lightly spray a cookie sheet.
Sprinkle a little flour on a flat surface and on a rolling pin.
Roll the dough out to 1/4 inch thickness, turning the dough as needed and adding flour to the surface as needed to keep the dough from sticking.
Use a shamrock cookie cutter to cut the dough.
Place the cut cookies on the prepared baking sheet.
Bake 8 minutes or until they are just beginning to brown.
Remove and allow to cool 2 minutes then transfer to a wire rack to continue cooling.
Place the confectioners’ sugar into a mixing bowl.
Add the powered egg whites and toss to combine.
Whisk the water into the mixture until the icing is smooth.
Add the food coloring and gently stir to color the icing.
Ice one side of each cookie with the icing.
Set the cookies back on the wire rack and allow the icing to harden slightly before serving.

Serves: 18 cookies

Use other St. Patrick cookie cutters and make whatever designs you like. Be sure to divide the icing into separate bowls if you want to use different colors. More green food coloring can be added to make your shamrocks darker in color.

Final Thought

That’s it for this edition of the Hillbilly Housewife Newsletter. I hope you’ve had as much fun reading it as I had creating it for you. I also hope that you have found the information helpful and useful.

Do you have a question, a tip, a recipe or a story you’d like to share with us? Email it to me and I’ll include it in a future issue. Can’t wait to see what you have to say.

Warm Wishes,

Susanne – The Hillbilly Housewife

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